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Steven Mandel

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There are several authors of .NET books who not only know their material but are able to present the information in a practical manner. One such author is Scott Mitchell. This book is well written and is divided into four parts with a total of 24 chapters. While the level of the book is directed at beginners, it's a good refresher for more experienced developers who want to learn some of the new features available in ASP.NET 3.5. At the end of each chapter there are three valuable sections that the reader shouldn't skip. There is a Q&A section where clarifying questions are asked and answered, a workshop section where you can practice the skills developed in the chapter, and an exercises section to hone your coding skills. This book makes frequent use of the SQL data source control and spends a good amount of time reviewing the use of the GridView control and two-way ... (more)

.NET Gotchas

You might be wondering what this book is all about. As the author explains, the dictionary's definition of a gotcha is "an unexpected usually disconcerting challenge, revelation, or catch". Mr. Subramaniam defines the gotchas in his book as "those things that pop up unexpectedly when you're programming in .NET. … In this book I focus on the .NET framework and features that have consistently exhibited behavior that was not obvious to me." Mr. Subramaniam explains that the purpose of his book is not just to explain how to use a technology "but how to use it well and do thing... (more)

.NET Book Review — Best Kept Secrets in .NET

Lately, it seems that every computer book that you find is a weighty tome of at least 500 or 600 pages. You groan just thinking about having to schlep another monster-size book around. It is so nice then to inform you that sometimes good things do come in small packages. This book, while only 200 pages, contains lots of nuggets that will appeal to all levels of developers. Chapter one covers an exhaustive list of navigation short cuts that you will find in Visual Studio 2003. If you want to master getting around in Visual Studio, this is a great chapter to have nearby. I would urg... (more)

Head First HTML with CSS & XHTML

I'm sure that there are times when you visit your favorite bookstore to look at new books on your favorite .NET topics and you cringe at the weighty tomes sitting on the shelves. You open these books and page upon page of continuous print swims before your eyes, but you figure it's important so you plop down your hard-earned money, take the book home, begin to read it in you rocker recliner and fall asleep. O'Reilly has developed a new series of books called Head First that .NET developers would be wise to take a look at. It uses a markedly different approach to important topics... (more)

Book Reviews

101 Microsoft Visual Basic .NET Applications Buy this book! I know you haven't even read the review yet, but take my word, if you are a VB.NET developer - particularly a beginning or intermediate developer - then you are going to want to have this book on your bookshelf. The book is divided into 16 chapters with 101 VB.NET applications grouped by topics. The majority of the book deals with VB.NET in a client/server environment, but there is some discussion of VB.NET in a Web environment as well. These topics cover a great deal of information, such as: Working with VB.NET Data acc... (more)